Craters of the Sun

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Contents

  1. Cool And Weird Impact Craters Of The Solar System
  2. List of largest craters in the Solar System - Wikipedia
  3. On the Moon, NASA Probe Sees Where Sun Never Shines
  4. Go from Quantum to Cosmic

See if you can spot the 35 mile diameter crater Eratosthenes which lies to the east of Copernicus.


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  • Photography, cartoons and fiction by Brad Skiff.
  • Lesson Plan Darkly Dreaming Dexter by Jeff Lindsay.

It does have a lovely central mountain complex though which can be seen with a small telescope. Two large 30 mile diameter craters interrupt the rim: Porter to the north and Rutherfurd to the south.

Cool And Weird Impact Craters Of The Solar System

Using a telescope, look north of Rutherfurd but stay within Clavius. To the north-west of Clavius D lies 12 mile Clavius C. The progression continues in an obvious arc with ever smaller craterlets.

This is a good test for telescope optics! Visibility : A pair of binoculars is the minimum requirement to see these features. When : Look for them when the terminator is close by, typically a day before last quarter.

List of largest craters in the Solar System - Wikipedia

You will need to use binoculars for this section. You will need to use a telescope for this section. Main content.


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  6. Section 3: Craters in shadow. See also.

    Largest Craters in the Solar System

    Image gallery: Craters in shadow Pete Lawrence's Moon guides. Whereas radar can penetrate a thin layer of regolith to bounce off the ice beneath, the laser pulses are sensitive to reflectivity at the surface.

    Marlo Vuyk, age 12, of St. Catharines, Ontario, Canada, for her question:

    Ice is very reflective at the 1. In the permanently shadowed craters, where radar observations have pointed to the presence of ice, the altimeter recorded dark patches of diminished laser reflectance. One possibility is that the radar-bright deposits, widely believed to be ice, could be overlaid by a dark material, such as a hydrocarbon, that can tolerate somewhat higher temperatures.

    He and his colleagues calculated surface and subsurface temperatures for the locations where radar-bright features tend to form and inferred a probable composition of ice pockets blanketed by regolith darkened by organic compounds. Peak temperatures in the shadowed craters, which can often be too warm for exposed water ice, mesh well with conditions at which dark organic molecules would be stable.

    On the Moon, NASA Probe Sees Where Sun Never Shines

    But just below the surface, temperatures in radar-bright craters tend to be colder, hovering near — degrees C. That is exactly the temperature at which water ice would be expected to remain stable, Paige said. John Matson is a former reporter and editor for Scientific American who has written extensively about astronomy and physics. You have free article s left. Already a subscriber? Sign in. See Subscription Options.

    Go from Quantum to Cosmic

    John Matson John Matson is a former reporter and editor for Scientific American who has written extensively about astronomy and physics. Get smart. Sign up for our email newsletter.