Murder at St Cuthberts (The Commodore 64 Mysteries Book 1)

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Contents

  1. Commodore 64 games collection
  2. #commodoreplus4 medias
  3. Images tagged with #commodoreplus4 on instagram
  4. Recalbox64gb - Jogos de Commodore 64

I think it was Jim Butterfield I learned assembly but alas, soon got bored with assembler This is so fascinating to remember! This is stuff you never think about I've done so many things, I've been in theatre, I fiddle with music, and in IT, I've done consultancy, web development, so many things, but every time someone asks me "what do you do? It's hard to believe that a computer can take so much place in one's heart. But I still get a warm feeling when I start an emulator vice or c64s and start playing a few games. In fact I lie, my first contact with a computer was with logo on an apple ][, at school when i was 8 around , but the C64 was the first one i got home.

Once you start taking over the computer, pushing it to its limit, you can never get back. I never finished school mostly due to that machine, while others where listening the math teacher i was inspecting C64 assembly code to understand how other guys made a nice effect in an intro or looking at protections routines The sheet was, maybe, 7 centimeters large.

It was a time where documentation meant nothing, and you had to get it the hard way. It was a time where experience was something you don't get until just after you needed it. It was a time where! It was a time where peer-to-peer was made with pigeons networks After that I've been a little on the archimede, then amiga for a few years, and finally the pc started with a -- the dos was a pain after the amiga and the archimede. Never left assembly programming though.

Sometimes i take one home, open it to clean the dust and start to play with it. Call that Nostalgy And guess what I'm paid to work with computers now BASIC in middle school and assembly in high school. And don't forget MULE. They came back with the courier 3 or 4 days later with the attached teletype output for analysis and correction.

You had to remember to indicate every single step on the coding sheet. Very frustrating. Later, we got a baud acoustic coupler modem at the school, but we were rationed as to how much we could use it because of the cost of the phone calls. In , the first 'personal computer' I had the use of but didn't own a ZX , with 1K of in-built ram and an add-on 16k memory pack almost as big as the computer itself which plugged on the back.

This had a tendancy to over-heat, so I used to use a tupperware box full of ice held to the back with a couple of elastic bands to prevent it going into thermal overload and dumping the program I was working. When this happened, it meant reloading the program from audio cassette tape--if I had backed it up recently--which was a very hit and miss affair at best. Examine what is said, not who speaks.

I think only how to solve the problem. But when I have finished, if the solution is not beautiful, I know it is wrong. I also remember writing a program to print banners on punch-tape, to play 'tunes' using the teletype bell--Colonel Bogey was a favorite, and playing star-trek on a teletype which has to be seen to be believed. When I first used an 80x24 green screen, an ADM 3A dumb terminal, I thought I'd gone to heaven, the star-trek game screen took less than 3 seconds to draw instead of about 3 minutes on the teletype: Examine what is said, not who speaks.

I find it interesting how many programmers are now returning to macs. I wonder if it's as much fun as it used to be An Apple floppy that when copied filled itself with strange characters up 2 the limit :. I still have the orginal Visicalc program in it's brown vinyl binder. Richard There are three types of people in this world, those that can count and those that cannot. I'm older than all of you! Actually, the first machine I programmed was an IBM I was taking a special math class in junior high school and they let us program the school district computer.

Turn in your cards and get a printout back in about a week. The first computer I owned was an Apple ][, much like yours. That and to get a pascal compiler that didn't rely on swapping floppies just to compile. And yes it's still sitting in the garage, along with the service manual that I was able to pick up not long after I bought it. The thing that really made me feel old is when I saw one on display in an exhibit in a museum down in Sydney. There is no emoticon for what I'm feeling now.

Ahhh, so you're the one To disagree, one doesn't have to be disagreeable - Barry Goldwater [reply] Re: Re: My first computer was These days, I bet a laptop is pretty common as a first computer, but that's because "everybody needs one. If you wanted to upgrade the 'hard drive', you could shell out dollars for an expansion unit installed by them, or pop off the cover and replace the floppy in the drive inside.

There was no external access to this thing, and if you obeyed the 'no user serviceable parts inside' warning, you would never know the difference. Only thing I managed to figure out was how to format a floppy disk My first computer equipment was a baud modem and a Heathkit terminal which quickly had a modified Domino's pizza box and a long ribbon cable added to make the keyboard detachable.

The first computer I owned was a Sinclair ZX The next was my current Athlon. I mostly used computers that I didn't own. I suspect you mean 64 k RAM how soon we forget. Boy, my second computer was a ZX with but a single measly Kilobyte of memory. I drooled over a the ZX expansion pack for a full 16K. In the days when computer were less cool than Ham Radio's, and assembly was a high level language!

How soon we forget! Light a man a fire, he's warm for a day. Catch a man on fire, and he's warm for the rest of his life. This sketchy description sounds very much like the Osborne 1 or the KayPro 2 with the the two 5. It was an interesting time. The OS booted in about 5 seconds, Wordstar took about 20K of memory using overlays to swap in code , a single floppy could hold the OS, an application, as well as some data. And a Heathkit H19 terminal, lovingly hand-soldered.

It was incredibly fast, too. You'd just have a few of clink-clunks disk accesses and your program would be compiled. Until Turbo Pascal, it was the hottest thing going for me, at least. Ampro: a single board computer that you would solder together. They were pretty fun toys. I loved that machine, good ROM basic, nice disk management, two switchable 64K memory blocks the kind of switch you can hear click! Though the modest graphics capabilities with x 48 monochrome pixels you couldn't really call them so. They were more little bricks nearly all in those days current arcadegames like Donkey-Kong, frogger or battlezone could be played sometimes you needed a bit imagination ;.

Yes, yes Often after nearly 5 minutes loading-time of a bigger programm the display signaled wrong parity. That was the worst. I remember staring at the two blinking asterisks at the top of the screen, hoping like hell that I wouldn't have to try again. Mostly I was waiting for "Pyramid " to load. My first project after typing in s of lines of BASIC code from the back of magazines so I could play, for example, a text-based racing game was a simple drawing program using the number pad to move a cursor around.

The '5' key turned the 'pen' on and off. What I couldn't manage was a blinking cursor. I was but a wee lad 8 years old. For what it's worth, I think I may have gotten a computer too soon, both in terms of my age, and in terms of the computer's capacities. I had a lot of drive, and even tried to learn Z assembler, but I couldn't hack it and found no support for my desire to learn more. But my family didn't have the money to spend on another computer, and I couldn't do enough on mine to keep me interested.

As a result, computing has for me only ever been a hobby. I wonder if it would have been different if I had had a C64, for example. BCE --Your punctuation skills are insufficient! Then you could rewind the tape, adjust the volume-control a tiny step and retry the whole procedure, sometimes several times. It was especially fun when the volume control wheel got dusty, and every minor movement added loud crackling noises to the process. I still wonder to this day if it was coincidence, or an ironic sense of humour on Radio Shack's part, reminding me of the quality of what I paid good money for And I was so amazed when we finally bought a disk drive Sort of off-topic, but it's been bothering me for several years, so I might as well ask here: there used to be a computer game that I loved to play, and I can't remember the name.

I'm mostly sure it was on the C64, but it might have been on the Apple ][ at school. In the game, there are lots of little people walking around in train stations. You have to go from train station to train station around the country doing something. I don't remember exactly what, but I think that somehow there were "bad" people spreading a virus to all the normal people, and you had to go around counteracting the virus in some way, within a time limit. That's about all the detail I can remember. Does anybody know what the name of this game might be?

Yes, yes I do. The game you're thinking of is Agent USA. The C64 version I didn't play the others had a particularly catchy song, which is currently my ringtone. It's been in my head that long. Edit: You can get the Atari version of this song naturally, not as good as the C64 version here.

Anyone remember Temple Of Apshai? Bard's Tale? Escape From Rungistan? Lot's of oldies I had no troubles with loops and conditional branching, but i couldn't grasp the concept of peeks and pokes i had no understanding of RAM, address space, and memory allocation , so eventually i lost interest in programming which i wouldn't gain back until I ab used that Apple until about and it still works Got the game as far as being able to move Pac-Man around, with either cursor keys or my home-made joystick, to eat dots and get scores, but couldn't determine how to make the ghosts move to chase Pac-Man or how to make sounds play concurrently with gameplay.

That project taught me to have the good sense to gratuitously use subroutines and structured program flow -- before then my projects mainly consisted of straight-through execution and GOTO's. I Learned a lot on that machine. I later ended up with FIVE of them, all in various states of disrepair and cannibalisation. My second computer was a hand-me-down Timex Sinclair It wasn't until '92 when a close friend of mine gave me his Amstrad k Zbased machine which displayed on a PAL monitor that I found a piece of heaven; internal 3.

Aah, halcyon days, friends. P h Phaysis Shawn If idle hands are the tools of the devil, are idol tools the hands of god? I got it after they had gone out of style and PCs were becoming commonplace. See my scratchpad for a brief glimpse down memory lane. I loved programming it for sound and graphics.

My attempts at sound effects would drive my parents bonkers on the weekend! I too wrote a pac-man like game that used the joysticks for input. That was fun! The modem was key, as it was my first experience with a BBS. I remember thinking "Wow, this is really klugey. Seems like this could be done far better. Wait, that wasn't me, that was Al Gore. Sorry, I confuse them a lot. In , I bought a Mac Plus.

Commodore 64 games collection

It's the smartest thing I've ever done in my life. I was able to write all my papers for school, recycle them for other classes, and having the spell checker was worth a full letter grade. This also insured that computers would still be part of my life when I left college, setting me on the path to, uh, spending my Saturday nights posting on Perl Monks.

Damn you, Steve Jobs! I'm an American. I want more. Nothing has quite ever replaced the experience of listening to the BASIC program you wrote as it loads back onto the machine.


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I still remember getting it for Christmas. I really really wanted an Atari so I could play games. I was very miffed when I got that TI, but soon I learned that not only could the TI play games, but it would let me write my own also! TI Basic was my very first programming language, self-taught from a book. Probably the best thing that ever happened to me, as it shaped what would eventually become my career. I never did solve those, though. I'd go into more detail, but I've already been downvoted a whole bunch for no apparent reason.

The note was at -4 when I replaced it with something worth downvoting. I don't care about the XP points, it irritates me to no end that the note was downvoted -- there wasn't anything worth downvoting. Well if this note is going to be randomly downvoted, I might as well have something to downvote in it. Someone downvoted every single reply. A few people suck. Don't take it personally. A single downvote is almost always something to just ignore. Even two downvotes is often something to just ignore. Restore your node so we have a good reason to upvote it and more than cancel out the actions of the jerks.

Re: My first computer was The field has shrunk considerably in recent times though. A whole freakin' meg of memory for a sweet price. Graphics were great. The built in MIDI port was cool. Well, maybe productive is the wrong word, but it had the fun factor. Now if I can just find my boot disk I'm guessing the ST isn't on the list though because it was never very big in the US; the amiga was more popular, whereas in europe the ST was the hobbyists choice.

Z80A I think My first computer in the sense of "the first owned by me" is a Power Macintosh G3 beige. Last year it got the company of a dual processor G4 1GHz the loud one, but now quieter after I installed this exchange kit by Apple. The first computer I used was an Atari ST My father bought it in ? But my sister and I were only allowed to play with it, if we also learned programming.

It is still working, but needs a really long startup-time due to the long memory-test-time, it was expanded several times. I had also contact with a few C at a computer course for kids at our bank, also at school around Commodore? Funniest "porting project": I had a game called "Avalun", where you had to reign a kingdom. Votes cast between and server time were lost when some minor tuning of the option list went awry. If you voted during that window, you can revote. Used it mostly for games but I wrote my first BASIC program on it - well, copied some code from a magazine if that counts Emphasis mine.

You wouldn't be Ben Daglish then by any chance? I think Jarre was ripped off for a few other C64 games. I can remember playing at least 2 or 3. The only one I can remember off the top of my head though is Trollie Wallie Karateka was good. Was that the game that US Gold released? I think I vaguely remember it. Something about a cannon on a ship and you had to fire at another ship by 'guessing' the right angle of the gun barrel. Something like that anyway I could barely run Win 3. It also made me long for shared memory. Helas I fried that puppy when the wires from my home-made "sound system" grounded on the mother board.

I eventually ended up with a Tandy CGP printer. That's pretty much the worlds most obscure processor, and also the one that I learned assembler on. I can remember going around to a friends place and playing Conan the Barbarian on his ][e. I actually feel reassured by the choices presented in the poll.

If there were five flavours of PDP, I'd feel young. If there were five flavours of Visual Basic, I'd feel old. But as the poll stands, it is "Not too heavy, not too light - just right. I had a big discussion read argument with a friend of my age about why you couldn't arbitrarily write to arbitrary memory addresses to affect arbitrary peripherals arbitrarily. There was a based XT later, I think. Isn't the just an with 8-bit instead of bit bus to save some money in the supporting components?

Anyway, I answered because that was in the first computer I actually bought with my own money not a trivial expense at 12 years of age, either, but it certainly ended up being a good long-term investment. They were actually connected via a primitive network to a centralized 10MB hard disk. Learning assembly language and tinkering with the boot loaders on those things was fun, I must admit. I loved it, and still have it packed up in my garage.

It had some awesome software, for the times.

#commodoreplus4 medias

Years and years ago my father built a Heathkit H87A, which he recently gave to me. I've got all the books, software and hardware and it's all in working order. He didn't have room for it anymore and he just couldn't bring himself to throw it out completely. Someday I may turn it on and take it for a spin, for old times sake. My favourite games used to take 5 minutes to load from tape, complete with squawks and flashes. Ah, those were the days. Now my TI calculator uses the same ZX80 processor - most modern mobile phones are more powerful I used to literally bleed after a long session messing around on that machine, due to the hard square-edged keys digging into my fingers.

If the information in this post is inaccurate, or just plain wrong, don't just downvote - please post explaining what's wrong. That way everyone learns. This was a MC based microprocessor training system I had to have for tech school circa It came with one byte bank of memory and had sockets for a second. The person I bought it from had installed the second bank.

I ended up buying a third pair of chips and stacking them on top of one of the existing banks. Internally, the system decoded for four banks so i just had to run a wire to the enable lines. With the three banks, I had a whole bytes of RAM. The first PC class machine I owned was actually an office machine. I worked for DEC and they gave me a Rainbow to use at home.

I think the Rainbow design was better in some aspects than the IBM PC but DEC made some critical mistakes like not giving the machine a bus that you could plug cards into. It had slots on the motherboard that would accept specific option cards. Since no one else but DEC could make cards for this system, it didn't quite catch on. I still have this machine in the basement it wasn't worth much when I left DEC so they let me keep it and it still works.

By November, the MB hard drive had a linux partition on it. My best friend got an early Commodore, and when my dad got an unexpected income tax refund, I got one too. I managed to create a hi-res printer driver for my CitizenD printer, which was rather fun. The C64 is fully functional, and lives up in the loft, I really should dig it out when I get time one of these days! Anyone have one by any chance? Yup, lots online as ROMs, but I need a tape : First owned was a P, most of which is still doing service in various computers. I have a Commodore PET lying around at my parents too bought for a fiver..

Classic game. Probably the best thing about the BBC as I recall I wasn't even born at the time some of you already hacked computers ;. So I'm one of the Pentium 1 people. It was bought in and ran windows95 and is still in use as family-internet-router running NetBSD. Since then we've always bought a new computer with a new Pentium, so now there are 4 in use, the latest since yesterday. But 8 years are nothing compared to 20, i mean, i've always had a CD-ROM drive, and i've "seen" such large floppy disks, but never used. And I actually woulnd't want to, probably I'm just spoiled. Zounds, I say.

I recall that Vic Lobbied long and hard for it. It had a whopping 5k effectively 3. I'm a little bit surprised to see it on the list at all, but given that it's on, my surprise shifts to seeing that not so many folk had it as their first. Yes, I proudly hacked assembly! A friend of mine started out with a Vic We thought it was so cool when he got a 16k switchable RAM pack.

We both got C64's soon after and the Vic was soon forgotten Since I got my Vic long after its introduction, I also had a bad case of C64 envy I mean, 64K, sprites, and even better polyphonic sound! I can only imagine if back then that we paid attention to MHz It just took forever. Later we even got a graphics terminal for it - a tektronix storage screen, and programmed crazy shooting games for it. Ahhh - the joy of fiddling with floats in BASIC on a keyboard that was as responsive as the kitchen table - not to speak of the eyestrain of looking at a monitor that was salvaged from a broken down TV that the local radio shop let me have for lugging it away.

I'd better stop now or the tears will shortcircuit my keyboard. My first machine was built up from an chip and its friends on a perf board and wire wrapped. It wasn't even an S bus machine. Later on I inherited an Altair that someone had given up on assembling. After many hours of troubleshooting and eliminating his cold solder joints I had a working machine. Next on the parade of machines that trapsed through my house was a VIC that I interfaced to an ASR teletype so that I would have a printer to use.

Nowadays I have a 2. Very very few people started off with their own mainframe. When I am asked "my first university was Pete state university" and do not mean that I own it. But still, it was a start, and no doubt if I had kept it up I would be a really good programmer right now. Sadly it came to an end when someone spilt orange juice all over the keyboard, and my parents pawned the games and bought me games consoles instead. Weird little thing, 64k of memory but compatible with the Commodore Seem to remember it was only on the shelves for about eighteen months, if that, and then got shelved.

Played about with this for a couple of years, wrote a lot of very bad BASIC programs on it, then it went to the great hardware place in the sky and we upgraded to a Commodore 64 which seemed to be mentioned more in the few computer books in the local library, and also had the nice feature of having more games. Think somehow it'd drive me crazy quite quickly though so maybe one of those things best left as a vague concept.

I hoped to not be the only one who started with that machine :. I got mine used in ; I wrote my first assembler on it, small routines that animated automatic 'doors' via interrupt-vector-changes in games written in basic too well structured, after a couple of ours, the calling from subroutine to subroutine caused a stack overflow :. If you have a difficult task, give it to a lazy person -- they will find an easier way to do it.

Seeing the popularity of this poll, a lot people like the nostalgia. I'd forgot about half the computers I used when I was at school or at friends. Seeing the list has helped bring back some great memories, especially of some of the games. Originally two brothers who were given funding by their father a games and toys distributor scored mega success with their creations. They sold the name when the Spectrum market started dwindled and reinvented themselves as RareWare.

Nintendo now have shares in them and have only recently moved out of the farmyard barn they were based in, outside of Twycross by the zoo quite fitting for programmers. I went for an interview in The two brothers still own and run the company. An enlightening experience. This little beauty was the first and only color Mac with the old boxy footprint.

It was only in production for 13 months and it seemed like the compatible software was only available for that amount of time too. Interestingly enough the processor speed and maximum installable RAM was the same as my Palm Pilot currently supports. Talk about shrinkage My favourite cartridge was the one that gave you a proper 80x25 text screen and allowed you to have 'proper' lowercase letters! My girlfriend is now laughing at me for being nostalgic about computers : Bukowski - aka Dan dcs black. And I'm still waiting on my mail-in rebate from Microsoft! I think I even have frogger and air traffic controller in there too.

I may dig it out and fire it up for a little retro gaming session ;. I just threw out two old columbia "luggables" last year.


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  • I chucked em because they were taking up too much room in the closet, that, and I couldn't get either of them to boot. But as far as I was concerned, that was the best investment I could have made. I feel so OLD. You probably haven't heard of them because Franklin got sued into oblivion by Apple for patent infringement. Were they the first company wiped out by a lawsuit from Apple? Could be Another guy even ported fortran to that machine. The first computer I owned was a Pentium I I built with the help of a friend and his dad around We were both in "Programming Pascal" highschool where we used an "Apple][" what kudra describes, I think.

    MJD says "you can't just make shit up and expect the computer to know what you mean, retardo! The first you owned?

    Images tagged with #commodoreplus4 on instagram

    What does "My" mean? You could use "my" in ways that describe the first computer you used: "My first computer usage was on" or "My first computer experience was using a" But if the first computer you used was a IBM , you probably didn't tell people it was "my computer". In "My first computer was", the "my" is describing the computer.

    If the poll had been titled "The first computer I owned was I actually went to computer camp for two weeks one summer where they had TRS's. Any one else brave enough to admit to that level of Geekdom? They got to bootstrap the machine from zero. The system had 16K of memory Huge for that time and was 8 Bit. The coolest part about that system was the toggle switches across the front. They had to programs to drive the tape writer, a tape reader, an editor, a compiler, drivers for the DecWriters for human readable output, etc How cool was that?

    Oh, I forgot to mention, the thing was about 2. At the tender age of 9, I gave a lecture at a kids' summer math camp on the bus architecture of the Z I can only say that because I didn't go on to become a geek. I've asked my parents about this a few times since, because it seems so hard to believe. But they've always confirmed it. Then my dad found the actual paper: 3 hand-typed pages in a clear-plastic binder. My employer bought it for me, complete with a huge 40M drive and DOS 3. The modem ran at baud, and it was really noisy.

    When I was tired of using those noisy tape casettes I'd use those microcasettes which were like mini-mini-floppy drives : If only I was able to find of those special cartdridges in Istanbul, I think I'd break into games and try to apply the techniques given in Sinclair User. Ah, the joy of dark grey on light grey hardcopy all of four inches wide and paper so sensitive it went all black if you left it on a hot windowsill.

    Was it the spectrum or the ZX that had the expansion pack that would pop out if you leaned on the keyboard too hard? Still have the spectrum, plus all the extra gear, but the microdrive casettes don't work anymore looks like they were only good for a couple of years Martymart [reply] Re: Re: My first computer was That was my first computer. I remember my Dad making me a real simple little "Captain Power" game on it.

    I can't remember how he did it, I think he kept the program on a tape cassette and I had to plug the tape player into it. Man that's old! But I quickly learned the difference between technical superiority and market superiority and had to shift my focus to the TRS The Poly 88 software market was just too small to make a living from!

    I still have my Poly 88, but haven't powered it up in years. I started off on VAXen way back when, moved to various Unices, including a NeXT for which I still have the kind of fond memories that guys usually reserve for cars or playoff victories. It wasn't until I entered industry in '96 and started making some decent scratch that I could 1 afford one and 2 justify one. I'm probably not the only person in that category.

    Once I found out that I could run Linux on a Mac and could dual-boot, that was it. And now that OS X is here, oo mama The keyboard had custom colored keys so you knew how to set colors as you programmed. No format command so you were expected to buy disks from CompuColor; we got a huge box with the computer so we never needed any disks at 50KB each? I wish I hadn't sold it. Then the ST and then various intel PCs till today. Can't say that PCs are thrilling, but they are somewhat standard, esp.

    The keyboard sucked so bad. It's funny when you think of how common the Turbo button was and how often you had to actually use it only software only a couple of years old. If your program got too big, the stack would run into your executable code and crash the terminal. My first program on that was a chase game in which you were supposed to shoot a Star Wars Imperial Tie Fighter.

    You could run this program locally in the terminal, which was handy if the connection to the mainframe was down. Something like that anyway I could barely run Win 3. It also made me long for shared memory. Helas I fried that puppy when the wires from my home-made "sound system" grounded on the mother board. I eventually ended up with a Tandy CGP printer. That's pretty much the worlds most obscure processor, and also the one that I learned assembler on.

    I can remember going around to a friends place and playing Conan the Barbarian on his ][e. I actually feel reassured by the choices presented in the poll. If there were five flavours of PDP, I'd feel young. If there were five flavours of Visual Basic, I'd feel old. But as the poll stands, it is "Not too heavy, not too light - just right. I had a big discussion read argument with a friend of my age about why you couldn't arbitrarily write to arbitrary memory addresses to affect arbitrary peripherals arbitrarily.

    There was a based XT later, I think. Isn't the just an with 8-bit instead of bit bus to save some money in the supporting components? Anyway, I answered because that was in the first computer I actually bought with my own money not a trivial expense at 12 years of age, either, but it certainly ended up being a good long-term investment.

    They were actually connected via a primitive network to a centralized 10MB hard disk. Learning assembly language and tinkering with the boot loaders on those things was fun, I must admit. I loved it, and still have it packed up in my garage. It had some awesome software, for the times. Years and years ago my father built a Heathkit H87A, which he recently gave to me. I've got all the books, software and hardware and it's all in working order. He didn't have room for it anymore and he just couldn't bring himself to throw it out completely. Someday I may turn it on and take it for a spin, for old times sake.

    My favourite games used to take 5 minutes to load from tape, complete with squawks and flashes. Ah, those were the days. Now my TI calculator uses the same ZX80 processor - most modern mobile phones are more powerful I used to literally bleed after a long session messing around on that machine, due to the hard square-edged keys digging into my fingers. If the information in this post is inaccurate, or just plain wrong, don't just downvote - please post explaining what's wrong. That way everyone learns. This was a MC based microprocessor training system I had to have for tech school circa It came with one byte bank of memory and had sockets for a second.

    The person I bought it from had installed the second bank. I ended up buying a third pair of chips and stacking them on top of one of the existing banks. Internally, the system decoded for four banks so i just had to run a wire to the enable lines. With the three banks, I had a whole bytes of RAM.

    The first PC class machine I owned was actually an office machine. I worked for DEC and they gave me a Rainbow to use at home. I think the Rainbow design was better in some aspects than the IBM PC but DEC made some critical mistakes like not giving the machine a bus that you could plug cards into.

    It had slots on the motherboard that would accept specific option cards. Since no one else but DEC could make cards for this system, it didn't quite catch on. I still have this machine in the basement it wasn't worth much when I left DEC so they let me keep it and it still works. By November, the MB hard drive had a linux partition on it.

    My best friend got an early Commodore, and when my dad got an unexpected income tax refund, I got one too. I managed to create a hi-res printer driver for my CitizenD printer, which was rather fun. The C64 is fully functional, and lives up in the loft, I really should dig it out when I get time one of these days! Anyone have one by any chance?

    Yup, lots online as ROMs, but I need a tape : First owned was a P, most of which is still doing service in various computers. I have a Commodore PET lying around at my parents too bought for a fiver.. Classic game. Probably the best thing about the BBC as I recall I wasn't even born at the time some of you already hacked computers ;. So I'm one of the Pentium 1 people. It was bought in and ran windows95 and is still in use as family-internet-router running NetBSD. Since then we've always bought a new computer with a new Pentium, so now there are 4 in use, the latest since yesterday.

    But 8 years are nothing compared to 20, i mean, i've always had a CD-ROM drive, and i've "seen" such large floppy disks, but never used. And I actually woulnd't want to, probably I'm just spoiled. Zounds, I say. I recall that Vic Lobbied long and hard for it. It had a whopping 5k effectively 3. I'm a little bit surprised to see it on the list at all, but given that it's on, my surprise shifts to seeing that not so many folk had it as their first.

    Yes, I proudly hacked assembly! A friend of mine started out with a Vic We thought it was so cool when he got a 16k switchable RAM pack. We both got C64's soon after and the Vic was soon forgotten Since I got my Vic long after its introduction, I also had a bad case of C64 envy I mean, 64K, sprites, and even better polyphonic sound!

    I can only imagine if back then that we paid attention to MHz It just took forever. Later we even got a graphics terminal for it - a tektronix storage screen, and programmed crazy shooting games for it. Ahhh - the joy of fiddling with floats in BASIC on a keyboard that was as responsive as the kitchen table - not to speak of the eyestrain of looking at a monitor that was salvaged from a broken down TV that the local radio shop let me have for lugging it away.

    I'd better stop now or the tears will shortcircuit my keyboard. My first machine was built up from an chip and its friends on a perf board and wire wrapped. It wasn't even an S bus machine. Later on I inherited an Altair that someone had given up on assembling.

    After many hours of troubleshooting and eliminating his cold solder joints I had a working machine. Next on the parade of machines that trapsed through my house was a VIC that I interfaced to an ASR teletype so that I would have a printer to use. Nowadays I have a 2. Very very few people started off with their own mainframe. When I am asked "my first university was Pete state university" and do not mean that I own it. But still, it was a start, and no doubt if I had kept it up I would be a really good programmer right now.

    Sadly it came to an end when someone spilt orange juice all over the keyboard, and my parents pawned the games and bought me games consoles instead. Weird little thing, 64k of memory but compatible with the Commodore Seem to remember it was only on the shelves for about eighteen months, if that, and then got shelved.

    Played about with this for a couple of years, wrote a lot of very bad BASIC programs on it, then it went to the great hardware place in the sky and we upgraded to a Commodore 64 which seemed to be mentioned more in the few computer books in the local library, and also had the nice feature of having more games. Think somehow it'd drive me crazy quite quickly though so maybe one of those things best left as a vague concept.

    I hoped to not be the only one who started with that machine :. I got mine used in ; I wrote my first assembler on it, small routines that animated automatic 'doors' via interrupt-vector-changes in games written in basic too well structured, after a couple of ours, the calling from subroutine to subroutine caused a stack overflow :. If you have a difficult task, give it to a lazy person -- they will find an easier way to do it. Seeing the popularity of this poll, a lot people like the nostalgia. I'd forgot about half the computers I used when I was at school or at friends.

    Seeing the list has helped bring back some great memories, especially of some of the games. Originally two brothers who were given funding by their father a games and toys distributor scored mega success with their creations. They sold the name when the Spectrum market started dwindled and reinvented themselves as RareWare. Nintendo now have shares in them and have only recently moved out of the farmyard barn they were based in, outside of Twycross by the zoo quite fitting for programmers.

    I went for an interview in The two brothers still own and run the company. An enlightening experience. This little beauty was the first and only color Mac with the old boxy footprint. It was only in production for 13 months and it seemed like the compatible software was only available for that amount of time too. Interestingly enough the processor speed and maximum installable RAM was the same as my Palm Pilot currently supports.

    Talk about shrinkage My favourite cartridge was the one that gave you a proper 80x25 text screen and allowed you to have 'proper' lowercase letters! My girlfriend is now laughing at me for being nostalgic about computers : Bukowski - aka Dan dcs black. And I'm still waiting on my mail-in rebate from Microsoft!

    I think I even have frogger and air traffic controller in there too. I may dig it out and fire it up for a little retro gaming session ;. I just threw out two old columbia "luggables" last year. I chucked em because they were taking up too much room in the closet, that, and I couldn't get either of them to boot. But as far as I was concerned, that was the best investment I could have made. I feel so OLD.

    You probably haven't heard of them because Franklin got sued into oblivion by Apple for patent infringement. Were they the first company wiped out by a lawsuit from Apple? Could be Another guy even ported fortran to that machine. The first computer I owned was a Pentium I I built with the help of a friend and his dad around We were both in "Programming Pascal" highschool where we used an "Apple][" what kudra describes, I think. MJD says "you can't just make shit up and expect the computer to know what you mean, retardo!

    The first you owned? What does "My" mean? You could use "my" in ways that describe the first computer you used: "My first computer usage was on" or "My first computer experience was using a" But if the first computer you used was a IBM , you probably didn't tell people it was "my computer". In "My first computer was", the "my" is describing the computer.

    If the poll had been titled "The first computer I owned was I actually went to computer camp for two weeks one summer where they had TRS's. Any one else brave enough to admit to that level of Geekdom? They got to bootstrap the machine from zero. The system had 16K of memory Huge for that time and was 8 Bit. The coolest part about that system was the toggle switches across the front. They had to programs to drive the tape writer, a tape reader, an editor, a compiler, drivers for the DecWriters for human readable output, etc How cool was that? Oh, I forgot to mention, the thing was about 2.

    At the tender age of 9, I gave a lecture at a kids' summer math camp on the bus architecture of the Z I can only say that because I didn't go on to become a geek. I've asked my parents about this a few times since, because it seems so hard to believe. But they've always confirmed it. Then my dad found the actual paper: 3 hand-typed pages in a clear-plastic binder.

    My employer bought it for me, complete with a huge 40M drive and DOS 3. The modem ran at baud, and it was really noisy. When I was tired of using those noisy tape casettes I'd use those microcasettes which were like mini-mini-floppy drives : If only I was able to find of those special cartdridges in Istanbul, I think I'd break into games and try to apply the techniques given in Sinclair User. Ah, the joy of dark grey on light grey hardcopy all of four inches wide and paper so sensitive it went all black if you left it on a hot windowsill.

    Was it the spectrum or the ZX that had the expansion pack that would pop out if you leaned on the keyboard too hard? Still have the spectrum, plus all the extra gear, but the microdrive casettes don't work anymore looks like they were only good for a couple of years Martymart [reply] Re: Re: My first computer was That was my first computer. I remember my Dad making me a real simple little "Captain Power" game on it. I can't remember how he did it, I think he kept the program on a tape cassette and I had to plug the tape player into it. Man that's old! But I quickly learned the difference between technical superiority and market superiority and had to shift my focus to the TRS The Poly 88 software market was just too small to make a living from!

    I still have my Poly 88, but haven't powered it up in years. I started off on VAXen way back when, moved to various Unices, including a NeXT for which I still have the kind of fond memories that guys usually reserve for cars or playoff victories. It wasn't until I entered industry in '96 and started making some decent scratch that I could 1 afford one and 2 justify one.

    I'm probably not the only person in that category. Once I found out that I could run Linux on a Mac and could dual-boot, that was it. And now that OS X is here, oo mama The keyboard had custom colored keys so you knew how to set colors as you programmed. No format command so you were expected to buy disks from CompuColor; we got a huge box with the computer so we never needed any disks at 50KB each? I wish I hadn't sold it. Then the ST and then various intel PCs till today. Can't say that PCs are thrilling, but they are somewhat standard, esp.

    The keyboard sucked so bad. It's funny when you think of how common the Turbo button was and how often you had to actually use it only software only a couple of years old. If your program got too big, the stack would run into your executable code and crash the terminal. My first program on that was a chase game in which you were supposed to shoot a Star Wars Imperial Tie Fighter.

    You could run this program locally in the terminal, which was handy if the connection to the mainframe was down. And by making it accessible through a hot key, you could appear to be doing serious work one moment, and be playing the next moment ;- Later on I simulated a slot machine, with the turning of the wheels being done locally, which made for a nice effect in those days.

    Of course, the terminal was used for doing serious development of Computer Based Training nowadays usually referred to as "e-learning" otherwise. Strange, but true. Still, it had a wireless infra-red keyboard. Good times It was a fun machine. Too bad I didn't use it to its potential I still have it in fact. I wonder if I could sell it on ebay?

    Would that be blasphemous? I still have the original RF modulator and everything!! I bet the sucker would still boot if I tried plugging it in. Hmmm, I should try that! My first computer was an ABC It was a Z80based computer with 8kb of memory, and was introduced in the late 70s. Swedish schools bought a lot of ABC computers. Then there was an ABC, which ran it's own version of Unix, and then the whole computerdivision was sold off to Nokia. I bought my first computer, used from a guy who sold PCs in the back room of his Pizza shop. It was a Mhz I think.

    The odor of pizza sauce never left the case or monitor. Programmed by dip switches and later a hex keypad made from a calculator keypad. Output was a 7-segment led display. My first computer was this devil of a system, the clone of one of the Apple series. Sadly, I think back fondly to it now. Good times. I remember recording games from the radio. My father bought it and and assembeled it. I remember switching one swith back and forth and watching the lights change configurations. Some how I knew it was counting more and more lights were turning on now I realize it was binary.

    I must have been very very young. I guess I realize why everyone here seems so much smarter than me. You guys have been involved in computers much? Much Respect, -Herman [reply] Re: Wow You'd be amazed how small the differences really are. I keep saying that this is a nice nostalgic thread, but never posted about my first computer, so here's the story. The first computer we had at home was a PC. We, of course, only had one for the whole family. I also played games on the Commodore 64 computers in the school and later some PCs , and on another Commodore at a friend.

    Later, we got a newer machine, a Pentium, and even later a second Pentium which I could then consider mine. That second Pentium is what I'm thinking back the most happily. I had to fit everything on a 2 gigabyte hard disk, which was divided like this: 1 gigabyte for DOS and Windows 3. The Linux partition was so small I barely fit on it, and I remember I had to remove big programs to install others from the CD.

    There was plenty of space on the DOS partitions, I only used at most megs of it, but partition resizing wouldn't have been so easy at that time. There was no way to make backups, as we couldn't yet have CD burners at home. There was also only expensive dialup internet, so I brought some software home from school using a meg mobile hard disk. That was the time I learnt the most about Linux and stuff like that. That computer was a real wonder of the time. It was so much faster than the Pentium. Some years after that, home computers got cheap so after the Celeron P4 computer after that, I got so many different ones, each better than the previous one.

    The improvement between each and the next one, while significant, was never so important in practice to me as the one between the PII and the Pentium. The Pentium was slow, the PII was fast enough to run any software I actually need like xterm or Netscape , but the first P4 was only better in that I could also run such complicated software fast that I didn't even need like gnome etc , and the later ones only kept up with how software got more and more complicated.

    Some other stuff I used in some time during these are an Epson FX 9 pin matrix printer; and a notebook with a cpu and 2 meg of RAM whose end was its hard disk dying; and a Nintendo Game boy. Incidentally, as the computers got better, the keyboards are getting worse and worse. Back with the s and the Pentiums, we were using IBM keyboards key ones with US-English layout printed on them and Hungarian layout put on it with stickers.

    Since then, I'm using worse and worse keyboards. It was actually a pretty neat machine for its time. I was messing around trying to learn fortran and exploring the OS while skulking from computer lab to computer lab hoping the attendants wouldn't notice the 12 year old kid that was, technically, breaking into the system. That lasted for the rest of the summer, when, I discovered that girls were even more fun than computers.

    It had that cool turbo button so you could boost the speed! I say the computer owned me because that's when I really fell in love with programming. I taught myself Pascal, Prolog and C on that computer and I've been programming ever since. I just wanted to add that I later worked at that university doing security work for IT, so I would assume that all is forgiven.

    Hearing or reading the phrase "My first computer was The head of the math department, Ron Gearheart, was very much a visionary when he realized that our generation meaning my classmates and I were going to be exposed to computers in a very real way. His logic followed that there was a need for all of us to learn a bit about how to use them. His solution to that was to decree that all students in any math class taught at our high school would have the requirement to write a program in BASIC that would: Take two numbers and add them Take two more numbers and find the difference and so for for multiply, divide, exponent of two and exponent of 10 and print the results.

    This was being done with ASR teletypes you had to put your program to tape first and submitted to a Honeywell time share system that we connected to via acoustic modem and was located in Minneapolis. We were in a suburb of Boston. From those humble beginnings I developed a fascination for making computers do my bidding. Up until around I still remembered the boot toggle sequence for the PDP I sorta miss those clunky boxes. First was the , then the and the more sophisticated My truly first computer of my own was a wire wrapped construction around the chip that sported a full 64K!

    Soon after the based computer I built a based system that had a Z80 "helper" attached to it to produce vector graphics on an oscilloscope for a project that I never finished that was to be a video game that would be a clone of the popular asteroids game. I had taken advantage of an "undocumented feature" in the Z80 that allowed me to emulate 16 bit output and drive two digital to analog converters at the same time.

    It's all a blur now, but I went with the Sinclair at one point, the VIC, Commodore 64, "Hack Shack Trash 80" and a few more home built boxes based on , , and a few other processors. There was this application out there called "Windows" that seemed to be creeping in on the scene and while it was neat to be able to run multiple things at once I wasn't too impressed with it at the time.

    I'd been exposed to X-windows and thought that was a much better deal as crude as it was back then and never expected this "Windows thing" to go very far.

    C64 - Murder On The Mississippi

    Fast forward now, and I'm a Linux bigot of the highest order. I have three desktops at and two laptops at home that all run some variant of Debian or another. Still don't think Windows is going to last Peter L. Yes No. Results votes. Check out past polls. Replies are listed 'Best First'. They first purchased it in. Power and simplicity, all rolled into one affordable package. To disagree, one doesn't have to be disagreeable - Barry Goldwater. Is there a future for codeless software?

    Yes No Results votes. PerlMonks graciously bestowed by Tim Vroom. PerlMonks is a proud member of the The Perl Foundation. Your skill will accomplish what the force of many cannot. My first computer was Need Help?? Heathkit EC My Commodore 64 was probably the best investment my parents ever made at least from my standpoint.

    Re: Re: My first computer was This is fascinating! Just three words: Same for me. Yep, just about the same story here, too. Have you never seen your code turned into a pattern on punch cards - a thing of beauty I think not A. Re: Re: Re: My first computer was Yes, I did have that experience, though only a very few times. I can remember programming Basic on that thing, which had an all-caps keyboard.

    My mother still has one of the games I wrote, although I don't have a computer that could use the disk. Most people I know around my age started with the C My first PC was the Apple ][ but not the plus. Babbage difference engine -- hah! So, I got a Commodore Well actually my brother did too, and I've still got his as well.

    You're probably not the only one who ever bought one, but you may be an instance of that extremely rare breed that had one as his or her first computer If not P, what? Q maybe? Well believe me, I mowed a lot of lawns, washed a lot of cars and all that stuff just to pay for that sucker. Not that I regret having it, but it sure started a lifelong addiction.

    Just a while ago my father threw away his Osborne 1, we couldn't convince him it was a piece of history A little bit of trivia about the Osbourne. My grandfather let me use his Osborne before I got my own Trash Slightly offtopic, but I have a Heathkit amplifier that my father built sitting on my desk.

    It is honestly the coolest thing he ever gave me. Apart from half my DNA, of course. Re: Re: Re: Re: My first computer was My first computer was a compatable hewlett packard. I was either 10 or 12 when I got it, and I used that thing until the first pentiums came out! When we finally replaced it, it wouldn't boot every time you attempted to do so, so you had to turn it off and on about 20 times before it would finally work.

    There were little tricks, like pressing the button slowly, etc. Anyone else have stories like that? In high school, I learned Turbo Pascal 5, and I've enjoyed computer programming since then. My father's friend trained new employees at his company on computer use, and he was a lot of help to me.

    The 's were programmed in a programmer of our own design which was run by an Interdata Model 70 which we purchased in as I recall. Interstingly we need floating point capability for a project only a couple of years later. For this we made our own hardware floating point box using a MOSTEK calculator chipset I think it was from an HP calculator as it worked in Reverse Polish Notation which we interfaced to the later A based design which by then had the and support IC's clock generator and bus support logic as I recall available. Now I wonder how we did it all! Boy this poll made me nostalgic!

    Especially as a hardware designer. It's in parts but I still have it. I currently have a few old computers not on the list, too. I really enjoy collecting older systems. Christopher E. The Atari with the 16k memory expansion module, and I even had a cassette drive to store code on. That and it ran Donkey Kong better than anything else at the time except the arcade game! All have thier function in my increasingly digital life : "Nothing is sure but death and taxes" I say combine the two and its death to all taxes! Actually it was an with 32K of memory. The OS was written by the floppy-disk manufacturer, Micropolis.

    A year or so later, this thing called CPM not critical path managment came out and I looked at it, but since my existing clients all were using the former, it took a while to catch on I miss it more every day I can't believe it's not psellchecked. TRS with 4k memory. The cool thing about it was the programs came on cassette tape and you hooked a plain old radio shack tape player up to it. You could listem to the programs too! Sounded like euro-techo music on crack! TRS too. First with 16k RAM. Adjusting the volume control was very tricky. Commodore You and me both.

    Recalbox64gb - Jogos de Commodore 64

    It was so cool not having to wait minutes for a game to load from tape :- -- vek They've been known to try to convert the young into Perl monks. It was a Christmas present from my parents in or was that ? I remember playing a lot of games like Hunt the Wumpus and Parsec , but eventually i learned how to create and animate sprites and wrote my first game - Money Bags.

    You control a cursor an arrow and move around the screen. There are two bags: one is a gold coin and the other is a bomb Re: jeffa Re: My first computer was Aah, the refresh that pauses. It was a gift to me by a friend of the family who no longer wanted or needed it his son was completely disinterested in it. I was given a cardboard box with the TI, several education cartridges, a voice module, some cassettes, and both of the instruction books.

    I didn't have a cassette deck, so I picked up a "slimline" recorder at a pawn shop. Later built the cable for the secondary tape recorder. Re: Re: jeffa Re: My first computer was You hooked it up to the TV and used a cassette deck to store programs. Needless to say, I geeked out immediately typing it in and debgging it.

    The next month, I realized that other gamers were into computers as well, as almost every letter in Dragon had a bug fix or improvement to the code. Sadly, the editors decided only to print the headers of each letter without the code, explaining that they were a gaming magazine, not a computer magazine.

    In retrospect, it should have occurred to me that I didn't have a printer and I had no way of printing out the characters I created. Ah, well. I started with a TI 4A as well. I still have that TI.. I should really think of something creative to do with it. Perl is stupid. Perhaps one should design his or her moderation system to withstand such actions. Just a thought. Some notes below your chosen depth have not been shown here. Atari ST? So where's the Atari ST on that list? Re: Atari ST? Re: Re: Atari ST? I think there were far more of them around at the time, than there ever have been of the Apple Lisa.

    Atari ST rocks! GFA Basic was certainly excellent, both compiler and interpreter, junked a lot of the bad things about basic, added in a handful of C-like and assembly options, even a reasonable IDE. First one that was actually mine was an old 16K ZX Spectrum, although I played around with a mates ZX, and this processor-on-a-board thing at school that you programmed via a hex pad Thanks for the update tye becuase when I looked at the numbers, my vote had disappeared just like the old Os 1!

    I mean I know they were heavy and the screens were small, but you never forget your first one. My parents bought me a Commodore 64 for my birthday in Oh, those were the days.